What To Use With There Was Or Were?

Was or were after if?

Guideline: Use were (instead of was) in statements that are contrary to fact.

Closer look: Statements contrary to fact, especially those that begin with “if,” call for a special form of the verb known as the SUBJUNCTIVE.

(Were is the correct choice even though the main verb is in the past tense..

What are second conditional sentences?

Meaning. Second conditional is used in situations/actions in the present or future which are not likely to happen or are imaginary, hypothetical or impossible. If I won the lottery, I would travel around the world and buy a castle.

Was or were in conditional sentences?

If the verb in the if clause is “to be,” use “were,” even if the subject of the clause is a third person singular subject (i.e., he, she, it). … See the examples below for an illustration of this exception: If I was a rich man, I would make more charitable donations.

Why do we use were with if?

The reason we use WERE instead of WAS is because the sentence is in the SUBJUNCTIVE mood which is used for hypothetical situations. This is a condition which is contrary to fact or reality (the fact is, I am NOT you). In the subjunctive mood we use IF + I / HE / SHE / IT + WERE for the verb To Be.

Is it correct to say I wish I were there?

They are both grammatically correct, though the sense of each is different. “I wish I was there” means that the speaker wishes (using the present tense: “wish”) that he or she had been (past tense: “was”) at a specific place at a past time.

Is Were future tense?

USE. Were to can be used in the future to emphasize that the conditional form is extremely unlikely or unthinkably horrible. Notice that this special form is only used in the if-clause.

Were True or true?

Strictly speaking, you should use were rather than was, although in everyday usage was is nearly as common. I wish it were true that I didn’t love you. “I wish it were true” is a way of disagreeing with something that somebody has just said, so it is appropriate if the other person has just said “You don’t love me”.

Why we use were in second conditional?

With the phrase “If I were / if she were… etc.” you are changing the “mood” of the verb from indicative to subjunctive (see quick grammar tip below). Therefore, whenever you use the second conditional to talk (or write) about a hypothetical situation, use were instead of was in the if clause.

Where or were grammar rules?

Just remember that “we’re” is a contraction (the apostrophe is a giveaway), while “where” is a location, “were” is the past of “to be” (in some cases), and “wear” covers everything else (sometimes literally).

What if there was vs what if there were?

Just as “he was” becomes “he were” in the subjunctive, “there was” becomes “there were.” So the answer to Jessica’s question is that “were” is the correct choice. Form 3’s existence is purely hypothetical, so the subjunctive would be “If there were a Form 3.”

Is if she were correct grammar?

“If she was” is past tense, indicative mood. It describes something that happened or may have happened in the past. … “If she were” is present tense, subjunctive mood. It describes a hypothetical situation that is not true.

What is the word were?

Meaning – Were is the past tense of the verb are. … Since were means the same as the past tense of are in this sentence, it is the correct word to use. SUGGESTION: To test whether were is the correct word to use in a sentence, see if you can use are in its place, putting the sentence into the present tense.

Can we use was in second conditional?

In the second conditional, when the verb in the if-clause is a form of be, we use were instead of was. Note that this use of were is possible and recommended with all subjects. Was is also becoming acceptable, but many grammarians still insist that you should use were.

Can you use were instead of was?

Was is used in the first and third person singular past. It is used for statements of fact. Were is used in the second person singular and plural and first and third person plural. It is used in the subjunctive mood to indicate unreal or hypothetical statements.

Which is correct grammatically correct if I was or if I were?

Many people use if I was and if I were interchangeably to describe a hypothetical situation. The confusion occurs because when writing in the past tense, I was is correct while I were is incorrect. However, when writing about non-realistic or hypothetical situations, if I were is the only correct choice.

How do you use have had in one sentence?

We use have had in the present perfect when the main verb is also “have”:I’m not feeling well. I have had a headache all day.She has had three children in the past five years.We have had some problems with our computer systems recently.He has had two surgeries on his back.

What tense should I use after if?

It depends on whether you want to emphasize a single moment in time (simple form) or the an extended period of time (-ing form). In either case, use will + verb in the main clause. When the situation is unreal, but likely, use present tense in the conditional clause and will + verb in the main clause.